Biologists form human chain to help trapped dolphins

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FWC Biologists forming human chain to move dolphins from a small channel near Tampa Bay. (NOAA Fisheries)

TAMPA BAY, Fla. (WMBB) — On Monday morning, a group of marine mammal experts worked to re-direct a group of dolphins that had been swimming in a small canal system for several days.

The dolphins appeared to be trapped in the canal by a low lying, busy bridge, which was forming a perceived barrier for the animals.

Biologists from Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and Clearwater Marine Aquarium formed a “human chain” to gently herd the dolphins, including two adults, a juvenile and a calf, up the canal. The dolphins immediately responded to biologists who swam slowly, splashing as needed.

FWC Biologists forming human chain to move dolphins from a small channel near Tampa Bay. (NOAA Fisheries)

The dolphins eventually went under the bridge and out into Tampa Bay. The entire event took about an hour and was a success!

If you see an animal in trouble please call your local Marine Mammal Stranding Network who are trained and can respond to the situation.

Please also remember to never feed or attempt to feed wild dolphins – it’s lethal and illegal.

This rescue was conducted under the authority of the Marine Mammal Protection Act.

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